Alfred Palmer Smokestacks Alfred Palmer Smokestacks

Why This Planet Matters – A Call To Action

The current species extinction rate is estimated to be between 1000 to 10000  and the total number of known threatened animal species has increased from 5,205 to 8,462 since 1996. People and threatened species are often concentrated in the same areas.

Earth is a singular oasis of life in the vastness of the cosmos. Our globe is home to a diverse range of ecosystems that support life in all its forms, from the tops of mountains to the bottom of the ocean. However, comes a sobering reality: the planet is facing unheard-of difficulties, such as pollution.

  • Approximately nine million deaths in 2015 were linked to pollution.
  • Every year, the global population generates approximately 1.3 billion tons of waste (equivalent to the weight of 6.5 million blue whales).
  • Exposure to air pollution during early pregnancy increases the risk of birth defects.

The current species extinction rate is estimated to be between 1000 to 10000  and the total number of known threatened animal species has increased from 5,205 to 8,462 since 1996. People and threatened species are often concentrated in the same areas.

Mass Extinction Mass Extinction Biodiversity Mass Extinction Dinosaurs Mass Extinction Animals Mass Extinction Earth 864853
(Previous mass extinctions have targeted newly evolving species – Photo: Getty)

In certain seismically active regions of the world, excessive urbanization has resulted in the development of megacities, which have 20,000–60,000 people per square kilometer. These cities are particularly susceptible to the negative effects of earthquakes, which include high rates of trauma, hypoxia, hypothermia, and acute respiratory failure fatalities, in addition to fractures and other injuries brought on by the collapse of infrastructure. Deforestation and habitat loss also harms the natural cycles of ecosystems, affecting all stages of animal life from reproduction, to migration, to mating.agriculture-related emissions measure 11.6 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions, which include carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide.

The horrific ramifications of climate change are already evident and affect a wide range of issues, including global hunger in countries like Somalia, health, education, migration in Sudan, and economics.

These natural disasters are costing lives, livelihoods, and money because of climate change brought on by human activity. In fact, a World Meteorological Organization (WMO) report claims that they have cost $4 trillion and 2 million deaths in the last 50 years. 

You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you. What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.

Jane Goodall
Jane Goodall Primatologist
(Photo: Wave Expeditions Uganda)

These consequences of environmental degradation are far-reaching, affecting everything from human health and particularly those in the Global South, are disproportionately affected by environmental hazards, facing food insecurity, water scarcity, and displacement due to climate-related disasters. 

According to UNICEF children in 98% of Africa nations are extremely or critically vulnerable than adults to the effects of environmental shocks, stresses, and climate change. Physically, they are less able to withstand and survive natural calamities like heat waves, hurricanes, droughts, and floods. Biologically, they are more vulnerable to dangerous substances like lead and other forms of pollution.

Over 200 million young people in Africa are disproportionately affected by the remarkable effects of climate change on their health, prospects, and general well-being.

In the face of these daunting challenges, it is imperative that we recognize our collective responsibility as young people to protect and preserve the planet for current and future generations.

We are all responsible for creating a world that is more robust and sustainable. Whether it’s planting trees with Earth Volunteers, participating in climate education campaigns, or supporting youth climate movement, all of these actions can help us stay below 1.5 degrees Celsius as per the Paris Agreement.

We have the power to motivate a fresh group of environmentalists who are dedicated to creating a more sustainable future especially in Africa – Environmental activist and a secretary at Earth Volunteer.

Lydia Kisakye

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